e-Newsletter

Oak Creek Public Library card holders with an email address on file automatically join our mailing list. Don’t have a library card? No problem! You can still subscribe to our e-Newsletter by filling out and submitting the below form. Users can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the ‘unsubscribe’ link available in every email.

Archive

Looking for past issues of our e-Newsletter? Follow the links below to explore.

Book Recommendations

Interested in receiving personalized book recommendations? Fill out a simple form to let us know what type of books you like to read. Each month on the 15th, you’ll receive an email with six titles from each category you choose. You can opt out at any time, or simply fill out the form again to change your preferences. Sign up for MCFLS Book Recommendations.

Silent Book Club

A woman who is wearing white shoes, blue jeans, and a yellow shirt is reclining against a blue sofa while reading a book.If you’re looking for a more flexible format of book club, join our Silent Book Club! This is where you can read the book you want, when you want. There are no deadlines, no limits to how many books you can post about, and no membership restrictions. When you’re finished with your book, just fill out this quick questionnaire telling us what you liked or disliked and whether or not you would recommend it to someone else. Books can be any genre, any length, and any format!

If you are interested in discussing what you are reading with others, you’ll be invited to our dedicated Google Chat after filling out your first questionnaire. Our librarians will select posts for display in the library, which is where you can also check out what other members are reading!

Are you in a reading rut or just not sure where to start? Be sure to browse our booklists for recommendations. Interested in setting up a book club of your own? Try our monthly DIY Book Club.

Social Media User Responsibility Policy

Friends Fundraisers

Support the library on McDonald’s Night! Order at either Oak Creek McDonald’s location on the specified date, and they will donate 20% all library-designated sales collected during the fundraiser time to the Friends of the Library.

Please present this voucher when ordering at the restaurant. Thank you for supporting your community!

When:
Tuesday, August 23
5:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Where:
McDonald’s – Howell & Puetz
8800 S Howell Ave
Oak Creek, WI 53154

McDonald’s – 13th & Ryan
9471 S 13th St
Oak Creek, WI 53154

Download and print the voucher.

McDonalds Night Voucher

Featured Collection

You can browse the Featured Collection by using the CountyCat catalog, or visit it in person at the library. While materials in this collection rotate every year, its permanent home is located on the 2nd in the adult non-fiction section. View a map of the building before your visit.

Sikh Collection

On April 9, 2022 the Oak Creek Public Library proudly unveiled the Sikh Collection, with an open house event attended by a gathering of library patrons, members of the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin and the Sikh Coalition, and local dignitaries including Mayor Daniel Bukiewicz, former Mayor Stephen Scaffidi, former U.S. District Attorney James Santelle, and Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes.

The Sikh Collection offers 160+ materials, including books for children and adults, movies, and more. It is the first in a series of featured collections specially curated by library staff to highlight the diversity, talents, and history of our local, state, and national communities.

Browse items in this collection on CountyCat.

Find recommended materials with our pathfinder.

Stars on the Square


STARS ON THE SQUARE A WALKING TOUR OF HISTORIC U.S. FLAGS map

13 STAR FLAG

THIRTEEN STAR U.S. FLAG

May 1776

On June 14, 1777, the 2nd Continental Congress passed the Flag Resolution making this the official flag of the United States. Sometimes referred to as the Betsy Ross flag, historians actually believe that Francis Hopkinson, a congressman from New Jersey and a signer of the Declaration of Independence, designed the flag.

This original flag, has 13 stripes and 13 stars to represent each of the original 13 colonies.


STAR SPANGLED BANNER – 15 STAR FLAG

1795 – 1818

On May 1, 1795, the Flag Act went into effect and the Star-Spangled Banner Flag, composed of 15 stars and 15 stripes became the new official flag of the United States.
The additional stars and stripes were added to represent the addition of Vermont (March 4, 1791) and Kentucky (June 1, 1792) to the Union.

The 15-star flag would last for 23 years and five presidents would serve under it. This flag inspired Francis Scott Key to write “The Star Spangled Banner,” our national anthem, after he saw it continue to fly over Fort McHenry following a British Bombardment during the War of 1812.

15 STAR FLAG

20 STAR FLAG

20 STAR FLAG

1818 – 1819

With the westward expansion of the United States, Congress realized that adding stripes to the flag would be impractical. The Flag Act of April 4, 1818 provided a constant 13 stripes on all future American flags and one star for each state. The act also stated that future flags would be officially modified on July 4 of the year following the admission of each new state.

This flag added five stars for the admission of Tennessee (June 1, 1796), Ohio (March 1, 1803), Louisiana (April 30, 1812), Indiana (December 11, 1816) and Mississippi (December 10, 1817).

It was the first of nine flags to last only about a year.


21 STAR FLAG

1819 – 1820

Just over a year after the 20-Star Flag was introduced, Illinois joined the Union on December 3, 1818. The 21 Star Flag become the official United States Flag on July 4, 1819.

21 STAR FLAG

23 STAR FLAG

23 STAR FLAG

1820 – 1822

The 23 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1820. Two stars were added for the admission of Alabama (December 14, 1819) and Maine (March 15, 1820).
President James Monroe was the only president to serve under this flag as well as the previous two flags.


24 STAR FLAG

1822 – 1836

The 24 Star Flag become the official United States Flag on July 4, 1822.  A star was added for the admission of Missouri on August 10, 1821.

Missouri, a slave state, was admitted as part of the Missouri Compromise, which sought to achieve a balance between free and slave states.  The compromise included the admission of Maine, a free state, which had separated from Massachusetts and become a state in 1820.

24 STAR FLAG

25 STAR FLAG

25 STAR FLAG

1836 – 1837

The 25 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1836.  A star was added for the state of Arkansas which was admitted to the Union on June 15, 1836.

Arkansas was part of the Louisiana Purchase and carved out of what became the Missouri Territory to become its own territory.


26 STAR FLAG

1837 – 1845

The 26 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1837.  A star was added for Michigan which became a state on January 26, 1837.

Michigan was admitted to the Union as a free state to help maintain the balance between slave and free states.  Michigan’s admission has been previously thwarted because of a border dispute with Ohio, but President Andrew Jackson helped Michigan save face by awarding it land from the Upper Peninsula, and then granted it statehood, boosting the number of states to 26.

26 STAR FLAG

27 STAR FLAG

27 STAR FLAG

1845 – 1846

The 27 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1845.  A star was added for Florida which became a state on March 3, 1845.

Florida, a former possession of the Spanish empire, was admitted to the Union in 1845.  It would not remain in the Union for long.  Florida would secede in 1861.


28 STAR FLAG

1846 – 1847

The 28 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1846. 

A star was added when Texas was admitted to the United States on December 29, 1845.

Before becoming the 28th state, Texas was an independent republic.  It is the biggest state in land mass in the contiguous 48 states.

28 STAR FLAG

29 STAR FLAG

29 STAR FLAG

1847 – 1848

The 29 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1847.  A star was added for Iowa, which became a state on December 28, 1846. Originally part of the Louisiana Purchase, Iowa was established as a U.S. territory in 1838 and grew dramatically because of its rich farmland.


30 STAR FLAG

1848 – 1851

The 30 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1848.  A star was added for Wisconsin, which became a state on May 29, 1848.

Not all residents of Wisconsin were enthusiastic about joining the Union as a state.  They had rejected it four times previously because they were concerned statehood would mean higher taxes.

30 STAR FLAG

31 STAR FLAG

31 STAR FLAG

1851 – 1858

The 31 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1851.  A star was added for the state of California, which was admitted to the United States on September 9, 1850.

The Gold Rush that began with the discovery of the precious metal in 1848 helped fast track California to statehood in 1850.  The admission of California fulfilled America’s manifest destiny of a nation extending from sea to sea.


32 STAR FLAG

1858 – 1859

The 32 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1858.  A star was added for the state of Minnesota, which was admitted to the United States on May 11, 1858.

32 STAR FLAG

33 STAR FLAG

33 STAR FLAG

1859 – 1861

The 33 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1859.  A star was added for the state of Oregon, which was admitted to the United States on February 14, 1859.

America’s expansion surged to the Northwest with the admission of Oregon.  Oregon was admitted as a free state, though its first two Senators, Joseph Lane and Delazon Smith, were proslavery Democrats.


34 STAR FLAG

1861 – 1863

The 34 Star Flag, also known as the Civil War Union Flag, became the official flag on July 4, 1861 to represent the addition of the state of Kansas on January 29, 1861.

Voter fraud over whether the state would be admitted as a slave state or a free state delayed Kansas’ admission to the Union.  Kansas joined as a free state just as the southern states were seceding. 

This flag was flown by the armies of the North during the first half of the Civil War.  The flag represented all the states, even those that were attempting to secede.

34 STAR FLAG

35 STAR FLAG

35 STAR FLAG

1863 – 1865

The 35 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1863.  A star was added for the state of West Virginia, which separated from Virginia (a Confederate state) on June 20, 1863 in order to rejoin the Union. 

The onset of the Civil War did not halt the admission of states to the Union. The western part of Virginia was pro-Union and contained many abolitionists. It split from the rest of the state, which had seceded. President Abraham Lincoln was unsure about dividing Virginia and admitting the western portion as a separate state. He agreed to its admission on the grounds that West Virginia’s action was an act of secession in favor of the Constitution. 


36 STAR FLAG

1865 – 1867

The 36 Star Flag became the official flag on July 4, 1865.  A star was added for the Nevada which became a state on October 31, 1864.

The Civil War was engulfing the nation when Nevada was admitted as the 36th state.  Nevada was pro-Union and President Lincoln saw it’s admission as a way to buttress support for the war.  To speed up statehood, Nevada sent its entire state constitution to Washington, DC, all 175 pages, by telegram.

36 STAR FLAG

37 STAR FLAG

37 STAR FLAG

1867 – 1877

The 37 Star Flag became the official flag of the United States on July 4, 1867.  A star was added for Nebraska, which became a state on March 1, 1867.

Nebraska was the first state to be admitted to the Union after the Civil War.  Rapid economic development, accelerated by the growth of railroads, helped speed Nebraska’s admission.


38 STAR FLAG

1877 – 1890

The 38 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1877.  A star was added for the state of Colorado, which joined the Union on August 1, 1876.

Colorado was a territory that partially came with the Louisiana Purchase.  It’s admission to the Union had been vetoed by President Andrew Johnson, but President Ulysses S. Grant approved it.  The 38 Star Flag would fly for 13 years.

38 STAR FLAG

43 STAR FLAG

43 STAR FLAG

1890 – 1891

The 43 Star Flag became the official American flag on July 4, 1890.  Five stars were added for the admission of North Dakota (November 2, 1889), South Dakota (November 2, 1889), Montana (November 8, 1889), Washington (November 11, 1889), and Idaho (July 3, 1890).

A flurry of state admissions boosted the star total as statehood filled out the United States in the high plains and far west. 


44 STAR FLAG

1891 – 1896

The 44 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1891.  A star was added for the state of Wyoming, which joined the Union on July 10, 1890, even though it was 5,000 people short of the 60,000 person requirement to become a state.

44 STAR FLAG

45 STAR FLAG

45 STAR FLAG

1896 – 1908

The 45 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1896.  A star was added for the state of Utah, which was admitted to the United States on January 4, 1986.

The area that would become Utah had been part of the United States since the nation received the territory as part of a treaty that ended the Mexican-American War in 1848. Mormons settled in the area, and their practice of polygamy prevented Utah from becoming a state until Mormons renounced polygamy in the state constitution.


46 STAR FLAG

1908 – 1912

The 46 Star Flag became the official flag of the United States on July 4, 1908.  A star was added for Oklahoma, which became a state on November 16, 1907.

Oklahoma became the first state to be admitted to the Union in the 20th century.  The United States had used the Oklahoma territory to resettle Native American people, but by the late 19th century, Texas ranchers began moving northward and the federal government decided to open up the territory for homesteaders.

46 STAR FLAG

48 STAR FLAG

48 STAR FLAG

1912 – 1959

The 48 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1912.  Two stars were added for the admission of New Mexico (January 6, 1912) and Arizona (February 14, 1912) to the United States of America. 

The southwestern territories of New Mexico and Arizona were the last to join the 48 contiguous states. The 48-star flag flew longer than any other flag before it, 47 years, and eight presidents served under it.


49 STAR FLAG

1959 – 1960

The 49 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1959.  A star was added after Alaska was granted statehood on January 3, 1959. 

Alaska, which was purchased from Russia in 1867, is 2.5 times the size of Texas, the second-largest U.S. state. Alaska became the first non-contiguous territory to become a state.

The 49-star flag was the last of the nine flags to fly for just one year.

49 STAR FLAG

50 STAR FLAG

50 STAR FLAG

1960 – PRESENT

The 50 Star Flag became the official United States Flag on July 4, 1960.  A star was added when Hawaii joined the United States on August 21, 1959.

Hawaii is the 50th state.  The 50-star flag has flown the longest of any U.S. flag, and in July it will have flown for 62 years. Thirteen presidents have served under this flag.


Attributed to USA Today, “The Stars and Stripes: Here are the 27 different US flags and their histories” by John Harrington, published July 3, 2019.  https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/07/03/july-4th-the-histories-us-flags-for-independence-day/39637697/

Banners proudly donated by Eder Flag Manufacturing.

Booklists

Looking for something to read? These booklists are curated by our librarians for all ages, interests, and reading levels.

CHILDREN BOOKLISTS      TEEN BOOKLISTS      ADULT BOOKLISTS

Come and see our Featured Collection, located on the 2nd floor of the library.

FEATURED COLLECTION

Would you like to request books on another topic or subject? Fill out the Library Materials Request Form and a librarian will pull materials for you to pick up at the library hold shelf or through Curbside.

Beyond Books

Looking for more than everyday books and media? Find board games, video games, playaways, technology, and other non-traditional materials by browsing the library’s various collections. Visit the library to browse these materials in person. Alternatively, fill out the Library Materials Request Form to request recommendations or specific titles.

Board Games | Video Games | Digital Audio | STEMCoding | Electricity Meters | Hotspots | Digitization


Board Games

Check out games from our board game collection by filling out the Library Materials Request Form. The loan period is one week, with two renewals available. Visit each link below for more information and to see what games are currently available for check out.

The board games Candy Land and Cheese DipBrowse games for Ages 3+

Browse games for Ages 4+

Browse games for Ages 5+

Browse games for Ages 6+

Browse games for Ages 7+

Browse games for Ages 8+

Browse games for Ages 10+

Browse games for Ages 12+

Browse games for Ages 13+

Browse games for Adults


Video Games


Playaways

See what Playaways we have to offer! Playaways are filled with the stories your kids love on an audiobook player made just for them. No downloads or Internet needed! The loan period is three weeks, with two renewals available. AAA batteries not included. Borrow a Playaway today by placing a hold through the library catalog.
The Playaways Look Both Ways by Jason Reynolds and Wings of Fire by Tui T. SutherlandBrowse Playaways


Wonderbooks

See what Wonderbooks we have to offer! Wonderbooks read to children, ask questions, and make learning fun with child-friendly controls. The loan period is three weeks, with two renewals available. Borrow a Wonderbook today by placing a hold through the library catalog.

Inside cover of a WonderbookBrowse Wonderbooks


Use the Library Materials Request Form to request Bee-Bot Coding Kits for checkout. These programmable floor robots are ideal for teaching control, directional language, and programming to young children. Each kit comes with 1 Bee-Bot robot and charger, 1 paper mat, 1 binder with instructions and reflection journal contained in a book bag. The loan period is one week, with zero renewals available.

Browse Bee-Bot Coding Kits


Watt’s Up? Electricity Meters

Use the Library Materials Request Form to request Watt’s Up? Electricity Meters for checkout. Watts Up? is an electricity monitor/watt meter that displays the electricity usage for any appliance in dollars and cents. Use this device to monitor and measure electricity consumption and better determine how you can save money on your electric energy bills. The loan period is one week, with zero renewals available.

Browse Watt’s Up Electricity Meters


Mobile WiFi Hotspots

Use the Library Materials Request Form to request a WiFi Hotspot for checkout.

Mobile WiFi Hotspots are portable routers that allow users to connect their WiFi enabled devices to the Internet, regardless of location or existing Internet access. In order to promote access to online resources, the Oak Creek Public Library circulates mobile WiFi Hotspots. To borrow a hotspot, a patron must be 18 years of age or older and have a valid Milwaukee County Federated Library System library card, an Oak Creek Public Library Fee library card, or an Oak Creek Public Library Access library card in good standing. Only one hotspot will be checked out per patron and per household.

Hotspots have a loan period of one week without a grace period. The hotspots must be checked out and returned to the Oak Creek Public Library; hotspots owned by the Oak Creek Public Library cannot be returned to any other library. Hotspots are available on a first-come, first-served basis; they are not holdable or renewable. Please see our policies for further details.


Digitization Equipment

Use the Library Materials Request Form to request specialized Digitization Equipment for checkout.

Digitization Equipment has a loan period of one week. Only one item will be checked out per patron and per household. The equipment must be checked out and returned to the Oak Creek Public Library; digitization equipment owned by the Oak Creek Public Library cannot be returned to any other library. These items are available on a first-come, first-served basis; they are not holdable or renewable. Please see our policies for further details. Currently, we offer the following items:

CD/DVD Drive
Play or burn CDs and DVDs on a computer or a laptop. Computer/laptop, media software, and discs not included.

Floppy Disc Drive
Utilize floppy discs on a computer or a laptop. Computer/laptop, media software, and discs not included.

USB C Hub
Transfer data from an SD card, micro SD card, and more to a computer/laptop/removable storage device. Computer/laptop/removable storage device not included.

Blue Yeti Recording Microphone
The Blue Yeti Nano enables high-quality audio recording, meaning that you can create a podcast, do voiceovers, and more. Computer/laptop and media software not included. Download the PDF instructions here.

Cassette to MP3 Converter
Convert your compact audio cassettes to digital MP3 files. Computer/laptop, media software, and cassette tapes not included. Download the PDF instructions here.

Elgato Video Capture
Convert your personal VHS tapes to digital files and burn to DVD discs. Computer/laptop, media software, VCR, VHS tapes, and discs not included. Download the PDF instructions here.

Kodak Scanza
This digital film and slide scanner is designed to digitize your 35mm, 126, 110, Super 8, and 8mm film negatives and slides. Computer/laptop and media software not included. Download the PDF instructions here.

 

DIY Family Escape Room

The Oak Creek Public Library’s DIY Family Escape Room kits are games that consist of a combination of physical and digital puzzle elements that must be solved in a set amount of time. Players of all ages are challenged to open the locked box or room using critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity.

You can register for a kit by visiting the events calendar. Supplies are limited.

Already have a kit? Check the links below to find your kit’s theme:

Totally Radical 80’s Time Travel Adventure

Halloween in the Library

Raiders of the Lost Locker

Celebrating Neurodiversity

Books can be placed on hold in four easy steps:

  1. Click on title
  2. Click the ‘request’ button
  3. Login to your account
  4. Click ‘submit’

You will receive a notification when your item is ready for pick-up. Need books on another topic or subject? Fill out the Library Materials Request Form and a librarian will pull materials for you to pick up through Curbside.

Celebrating Neurodiversity - J Fiction

Call Number
Title
Author
J ABRAMS KELSEYForever Amigo: An Abby StoryKelsey Abrams
J CARTAY PABLO
Each Tiny SparkPablo Cartaya
J CHERRY KATHLE
Everyday HeroKathleen Cherry
J CHOLDE GENNIFAl Capone Does My Shirts Gennifer Choldenko
J LUPICA MIKE
Team PlayersMike Lupica
J MACKLE CAROLYNot If I Can Help ItCarolyn Mackler
J MARTIN ANN
Rain ReignAnn M. Martin
J PANTEL NICOLE
Planet Earth Is BlueNicole Panteleakos
J PATRIC CATTornado BrainCat Patrick
J PLA SALLY
The Someday BirdsSally J. Pla
J SLOANCounting by 7'sHolly Goldberg Sloan
J URSUThe Real BoyAnne Ursu

Celebrating Neurodiversity - Picture Books

Call Number
Title
Author
PIC BAILEY JENN
A Friend for HenryJenn Bailey
PIC COTTER SAMANT
This Beach Is Loud!Samantha Cotterill
PIC COTTER SAMANT
Can I Play Too?Samantha Cotterill
PIC KARTHI LAVANY
A Walk with ThambiLavanya Karthik
PIC PEETE HOLLYMy Brother CharlieHolly Robinson Peete
PIC ROBBIN ROSETalking Is Not My ThingRose Robbins

Celebrating Neurodiversity - Non-Fiction Books

Call Number
Title
Author
J 158.13 ALLADI
A World of MindfulnessErin Alladin
J 759.13 CLO
Chuck Close: Face BookChuck Close
J 921 GRATemple Grandin: How the Girl Who Loved Cows Embraced Autism and Changed the WorldSy Montgomery

Celebrating Neurodiversity - Overdrive Books

Call Number
Title
Author
E Book OverDrive (Libby App)
A Boy Called BatElana K. Arnold
E Book OverDrive (Libby App)
SliderPete Hautman

Real Women, Real Stories

Books can be placed on hold in four easy steps:

  1. Click on title
  2. Click the ‘request’ button
  3. Login to your account
  4. Click ‘submit’

You will receive a notification when your item is ready for pick-up. Need books on another topic or subject? Fill out the Library Materials Request Form and a librarian will pull materials for you to pick up through Curbside.

Real Women, Real Stories - Picture Books

Call Number
Title
Author
PIC ENGLEDrum Dream Girl: How One Girl’s Courage Changed MusicMargarita Engle

Real Women, Real Stories - J Series

Call Number
Title
Author
SERIES AMERIC GIRL_N HELEN
A Girl Named Helen: The True Story of Helen KellerBonnie Badder
SERIES WHO_WA AUSTEN
Who Was Jane Austen?Sarah Fabiny
SERIES WHO_WA DIANA
Who Was Princess Diana?Ellen Labrecque
SERIES WHO_WA FRANK
Who Was Anne Frank?Ann Abramson
SERIES WHO_WA WILDER
Who Was Laura Ingalls Wilder? Patricia Demuth

Real Women, Real Stories - J Graphic Novels

Call Number
Title
Author
J BELL
El DeafoCece Bell
J BROSGO VERA
Be PreparedVera Brogsol
J TELGEM RAINA
GutsRaina Telegemier

Real Women, Real Stories - Non-Fiction Books

Call Number
Title
Author
J 700.92 NOVESK
Mary Blair's unique flair: the girl who became one of the Disney legendsAmy Novesky
J 741.6 EHL
The scraps book: notes from a colorful lifeLois Ehlert
J 921 BAKER S_JOSE
Dr. Jo How Sara Josephine Baker Saved the Lives of America's ChildrenMonica Kulling
J 921 CARDILL
Just Being Audrey Magaret Cardillo
J 921 CLARK EUGENI
Shark lady: the true story of how Eugenie Clark became the ocean's most fearless scientistJess Keating
J 921 GOODAL JANE
The watcher: Jane Goodall's life with the chimpsJeanette Winter
J 921 KAHLO FRIDA
Frida KahloLucy Brownridge
J 921 LAMARR HEDY
Hedy Lamarr's Double LifeLaurie Wallmark
J 921 MOO
Miss Moore thought otherwise: how Anne Carroll Moore created libraries for childrenJan Pinborough
J 921 MORENO RITA
A Girl Named Rosita: The Story of Rita MorenoAnika Denise
J 921 ROOSEV ELEANO
Eleanor Roosevelt: fighter for justice: her impact on the civil rights movement, the White House, and the worldIlene Cooper
J 921 SAC
SacajaweaKathleen Krull
J 921 ULMER MIKAIL
Bee fearless: dream like a kidMikaila Ulmer
J 921 WIN
Oprah the Little SpeakerCarole Boston Weatherford
J 921 YOU
I am Malala: how one girl stood up for education and changed the worldMalala Yousafzai